musicpickups.com

The musical instrument pickups, effects units and amplifiers designed and manufactured
by Harry DeArmond and Bud Rowe and finally Steve Tosh in Toledo, Ohio, from the 1940s to the 1980s, through Rowe Industries Inc.,
H. N. Rowe & Company, Rowe DeArmond Inc., DeArmond Inc. and Tosh Electronics, all of Toledo, Ohio, USA.

DeArmond numbered items


Pickups with official DeArmond names and/or numbers for guitar and bass are shown on this page.  These pickups and the DeArmond tube amps were sold direct to the public through appointed music outlets and mail order companies such as Targ and Dinner Inc., St. Louis Music Supply Company, David Wexler & Company of Chicago, Maxwell Meyers Inc., Musical Merchandise Company, Peate Musical Company, C. Bruno & Son Inc. and others.  Some of these products were also in catalogs produced by Carvin, Epiphone, Fender, Gibson, Gretsch, Guild, Oahu and Rickenbacker,

Pickups for banjo, violin, bass viol, ukulele, autoharp, piano, mandolin and the Stringtone key changer are shown on the page Other pickups and products

The DeArmond pickups factory-fitted in their products by musical instrument manufacturers including D’Angelico, Deane, Eko, Epiphone, Emmons, Fender, Gretsch, Guild, Chicago Musical Instruments/Harmony and their own brands (Airline, Alden, Barclay, Heathkit, Holiday, Montgomery Ward, Sears, Silvertone, Regal, Truetone), Harlin Bros., Heath/Heathkit, Hofner, Kustom, Levin, CF Martin, Messenger, Micro-Frets, Ovation, Premier, Rickenbacker, Truetone and Standel are shown separately under each of the links shown here.

Examples of packaging for DeArmond products including a guarantee card, catalog request card, typical instruction sheet, fixing accessories and various types of packaging are shown at the end of this page.

Examples of the various pickup fixing brackets, volume and volume/tone control housings are also shown below.

Model 40 Attachable pickup for flat-top roundhole guitar with separate V & T controls box, both items intended to be screwfixed to the top of the soundboard.


Model 41 Attachable pickup for guitar with separate V & T controls box, both screwfixed.  Note the baseplate/bezel, designed to allow the pickup to be fitted on both flat-top and archtop instruments (photos copyright Kenny Hembree).


Model 55 Attachable pickup with individual pole-pieces for archtop guitar with separate V & T controls box, both screwfixed

55-FB-12 ‘built-in’ set of two Model 55 pickups with wiring harness including V & T controls, switch and output jack socket

55-FB-7S ‘built-in’ Model 55 pickup with wiring harness including V & T controls and output jack socket

NOTE: DeArmond's 1965 catalog showed a different version of Model 55 which does not appear to have gone into production, and did not appear in any other DeArmond catalog.  See the photo below:

 

Model 56 Attachable pickup with individual pole-pieces for flat-top roundhole guitar with separate V & T controls box, both screwfixed


Model 130 Attachable Humbucker, roundhole flat-top guitar


Model 130-SC Single-coil version of Model 130 humbucker above



Model 200 - There is no such DeArmond pickup.  DeArmond produced the model 2000 pickup as used by Gretsch (who named it the Dynasonic), Guild, Hofner, Levin, Premier and others.  The Model 2000 was referred to as a 200 in some discussion groups and that name has unfortunately gained credence.
Fender produced a pickup which was similar in appearance, named the 2K (another way of expressing 2,000), for their range of DeArmond guitars.


Model 210 Attachable pickup with six individually adjustable pole-pieces for roundhole flat-top guitar.  The pole-pieces are Alnico pin magnets, each with a slotted head and a bonded, threaded sleeve


Some versions of the Model 210 pickup have the number stamped on the back, as shown here


Model 210-C as model 210  but with side-mounting jack and quick-disconnect cable


   Model 220 Attachable Humbucker, with integral volume controller, for roundhole flat-top guitar. The version shown on the left is the first, with the pickup secured by means of a hand-tightened collet arrangement, which makes the pickup a little awkward to install.  The second version, shown on the right, uses a spring-tensioned arrangement which is easier to install and remove (Right-hand photo copyright Robert Paulson)


Model 230 Attachable Humbucker, with integral volume controller, for roundhole flat-top guitar


Model 240 Attachable Humbucker with integral volume control, for roundhole flat-top guitar


Model 260 Attachable Humbucker, for roundhole flat-top guitar.  This pickup is unique in being the only DeArmond pickup with two separate sensors - a set of humbucking coils and 'DeArmond's exclusive Piezo-Magnetic Sensor (PMS)' which both operate together.


Model 400 Attachable pickup for archtop tenor guitar with separate V control box, both fixed with pressure rod and clamp.  Apart from the pressure rod, which is longer but the same diameter, this pickup is the same as the second version of the Model 500, Mandolin pickup (Photo copyright Greg Henderson, Atlanta Vintage Guitars)


Model 450 Attachable pickup for flat-top, roundhole tenor guitar


Model 450-C Attachable pickup for flat-top tenor guitar with side-mounting jack as above, but with quick-disconnect cable


Model 800 attachable pickup for flat-top roundhole guitar, with mini jack-socket connection and volume control.


Model 1000 Rhythm Chief with plain back insert, attachable pickup for archtop guitar, with V & T controls & rhythm/lead switch in separate box, both fixed with pressure rod and clamp, in chrome or gold-plated


 Model 1000 Rhythm Chief with red insert by H. N. Rowe & Company Inc., attachable pickup for archtop guitar, with V & T controls & rhythm/lead switch in separate box, both fixed with pressure rod and clamp, in chrome (photo copyright Greg Henderson of Atlanta Vintage Guitars, Woodstock GA)

Model 1000 Rhythm Chief by Rowe Industries, with red insert engraved 'MOD 1000' at the side, attachable pickup for archtop guitar, with V & T controls & rhythm/lead switch in separate box, both fixed with pressure rod and clamp, in chrome or gold-plated (photo copyright Roger at Music-Treasures.com)


 1000 Rhythm Chief, produced for Guild's 'Artist Award' archtop guitar, with insert engraved "Guild Award Model by DeArmond', fixed with small offset rod as shown, to side of neck.  Separate control box with either volume control only or V & T controls & rhythm/lead switch, usually fixed to pickguard


  Another version of the Model 1000 Rhythm Chief pickup head, chrome-finished, with black insert and gold lettering


Model 1100 Adjustable Rhythm Chief attachable pickup with individually adjustable poles, for archtop guitar, with V & T controls & rhythm/lead switch in separate box, both fixed with pressure rod and clamp


This gold-plated Model 1100 is one of a limited edition produced to order.  It was designed for screwfixing direct to the guitar's pickguard, and terminated in DeArmond's standard inline mini jack-socket.  The company was flexible and accepted orders for products such as this providing the quantity was sufficient.  In some instances that quantity could be as low as 50 items.  A similar variation on the Model 500 mandolin pickup finished in gold was also produced.


All of the Models 1000 Rhythm Chief and Model 1100 Adjustable Rhythm Chief adjustable pickups sold boxed were supplied with a clamp-type rod mounting system, with a separate box fitted with volume and tone controllers and a rhythm/lead pushbutton, as shown below.  This push reduced the volume.  The only Rhythm Chief pickup model not to have this type control box is the Artist Award version of the Model 1000, as shown above.  This pickup was factory-fitted by Guild in their Artist Award guitars over a certain period.  A basic volume controller was supplied, usually fitted to the pickguard, with only the control knob visible.  This pickup was fitted direct to the guitar's neck by means of a short offset rod, secured to the side of the neck with two small woodscrews.  This offset rod was eventually sold separately by DeArmond.  These pickup-fixing arrangements are all shown below:


The instruction sheet for these pickups is shown below.  It also explains how the controls operate:

In note 6 of the instruction sheet above, referring to the lateral location of the pickup, the model identification number referred to can be seen as 'MOD 1000' on the right-hand side of the pickup's red insert in the photo above.


A selection of fixing brackets for DeArmond pickups is shown above, and is described as follows:

1. (top item): For the Guitar Mikes Model FH/FHC series.  The length is 9.8" (250 mm.)

2. (item 2nd from top): Later version of item 1 above, DeArmond number ML-49, for the Guitar Mikes FH-B/FHC-B/FHC-C and the models 1000 Rhythm Chief and 1100 adjustable Rhytm Chief.  The length is 9.8" (250 mm.)

In DeArmond's literature, the rod assembly is also referred to as pressure rod or tension rod and master clamp.  It is often referred to as a 'Monkey on a stick', but never as such by DeArmond.

The pointed end of the rod is inserted into a corresponding hole in the pickup head and the tab on the other end of the rod is clamped to the instrument's strings behind the bridge.

3. (3rd from top): For the Model 500 Mandolin.
  The length is 5.3" (135 mm.)

The bracket for the Model 400 Tenor Guitar, DeArmond number ML-51, is not shown above, but is the same size as the Model 500 Mandolin pickup as item 3 above, but longer, at 9.8" (250 mm.)

4. (4th from the top) The offset bracket for the Artist Award version of the Model 1000 Rhythm Chief pickup as supplied to Guild, for fitting in their Artist Award Guitars.  This bracket is also used to fix the Model 1100 adjustable Rhythm Chief pickup to the neck, a method preferred by some guitarist as no contact with the strings is necessary.  To a lesser extent, it is also used to fix the FH/FHC/FHC-C Guitar Mikes.  This rod measures 5.375" (136.5mm.) in length.

The long end of the offset bracket is inserted in the pickup head and the other end of the rod is screwfixed to the side of the fingerboard.

The diameter of ML-49's rod is greater than ML-51's so they are not interchangeable.


Detail of bracket 1 above, early pickup rod. Note the round-headed setscrews screwed into the threaded holes, through the underside of the threaded master clamp from below.  Also note the slotted heads on the top clamp retaining screws.

Detail of bracket 2 above, a later rod for the same pickup showing the smaller, flat-headed retaining screws with milled edges and curved waist.

The pointed end of the rod is inserted in the pickup head and the tab on the other end of the rod is clamped to the instrument's strings behind the bridge.


Another view of the offset rod showing the two flattened sections, each drilled to accept a screw.


Early potentiometer housing for FH/FHC pickups.  Note the brown Bakelite milled-edge knob, the basic cylindrically-shaped housing with the overlapping cover, and the two hard-wired cables.  See the Control knobs page for more information.

A later potentiometer housing for FH/FHC pickups.  Note the black 'chicken-head' knob, and the more stylishly-shaped housing with the overlapping cover, and the two hard-wired cables.

This potentiometer housing supercedes the two versions shown above.  Note the screwed connector to accommodate a removeable connector cable.  Pots with 1/8" (3 mm.) diameter shafts and a smaller overall diameter were being used at this stage, enabling the use of a smaller housing.  Note also the clear acrylic tapered cylindrical knob and the flush-fitting cover at the base of the housing.


       


The three photos above show the control box for the Rhythm Chief Models 1000 and Model 1100 adjustable pickup. The knobs for volume and tone control, together with the Leviton manufacture pushbutton Rhythm switch are seen.  The pots in these photos have 1/4" (6 mm.) diameter plain shafts.  The two capacitors are also visible, between the two pots.  The larger one underneath, is connected to the tone controller and the smaller one on top, is connected to the Rhythm switch.  Operating this switch produces a drop in volume and a change in tone.


Model 1200 Attachable pickup, promoted by DeArmond as being suitable for 12-string roundhole flat-top guitar.  In fact, this pickup is equally suitable for use with a 6-string guitar.

Model 1200-C As Model 1200, but with detachable cable


   Model 2000-B Guitar pickup, original version, neck position.  Metal frame height is 7/16" ( 11 mm.) from flange to top of pickup.  The first picture shows the six magnetic pole-pieces and the six screws for adjusting the poles' height.  The second picture shows the underside of the pickup, with the brass rings crimped to the ends of the pole-pieces and the six screws threaded into the brass rings.  Finish options were chrome with black coil former or gold-plated with white coil former.

Gretsch began fitting these pickups in their guitars in the early 1950s, referring to them as 'Gretsch-Dynasonic' and 'Dynasonic Fidela-Tone' in their promotional literature.

This pickup has been accurately reproduced in recent years by Seymour Duncan, who refers to is as the 'Dynasonic'.  It has also been reproduced by Gretsch.

The Model 2000-T Guitar pickup, original version, bridge position, has a metal frame height is 9/16" ( 14.3 mm.)from flange to top of pickup.  Pickup is otherwise as model 2000-B above.

See the page Model 2000 variations page for more information.



  Model 2200 B Humbucker with bezel,
 neck position, chrome.  The mounting ring height is 3/8'' (9.5mm.)

Model 2200 T Humbucker with bezel, bridge position.  Exactly as model 2200 B above, except that the mounting ring height is 9/16" (14.3mm.).

Model 2200-1 ‘built-in’ set of two Model 2200 pickups (B & T versions) with wiring harness including V & T controls, switch and output jack socket

NOTE: The Model 2200 pickups above are dimensionally slightly larger than the 'standard' humbucker size made popular by Gibson.  This disadvantage was rectified when DeArmond introduced their Models 2300 and 2400 humbuckers shown below that are dimensionally compatible with Gibson's.


  Model 2300 Humbucker, no bezel, for neck or bridge position, with slotted pole-pieces


  Model 2400 'Superbucker' humbucker, no bezel, for neck or bridge position, with Allen-head pole-pieces


Model 2400-SC Superbucker, as model 2400 above, with split coil arrangement and 3-core conductor


 3000 Piezoelectric transducer, chrome, with separate V & T controls box


  Model 3010 Piezoelectric transducer, black


Model 3010-IMK Transducer inside mounting kit

Model 6700 Attachable S-grille soapbar for flat-top guitar with separate V & T controls box (photo copyright Terry Calvert)


Model 6701 Attachable S-grille soapbar for archtop roundhole guitar with flat fixing bracket, otherwise as model 6700 above, with separate V & T controls box


   6812 four-scroll soapbar in a white plastic bezel.  The bezel comes in three different heights.  This pickup is not recessed.  The number 6812 is stamped on the underside of the pickup, but is not referred to as such by DeArmond in any of their literature.
The white bezels shown above clearly show two different heights.  Some of these bezels have flat bases while others have convex bases to allow for installation in an archtop guitar 


Model FH Attachable 'Guitar Mike' for archtop.  The chrome spring-type protector around the cable helps identify this as an early version of the FH Guitar Mike.


Model FH-B Attachable 'Guitar Mike' for archtop, 'improved'


     Very early Model FHC attachable 'Guitar Mike' pickup with pressure rod that is hooked around 6th string (see photo 1 above).  Other indicators of the pickup's age are the cylindrical volume controller enclosure (referred to in-house as a 'cup' by DeArmond) with an overlapping lid, the dark brown domed mill-edge knob, the chromed spring protector on the cable as it enters the pickup head and the thin wire support at the side of the pickup, fixed at one end by means of a screw.  This arrangement pre-dated the metal tab that projected from the side of the pickup.  The arm projecting from the volume controller box in photo 2 above was clamped to one of the bridge's two height-adjustment screws.


  Model FHC Attachable 'Guitar Mike' for archtop, later version, with separate volume controller in tapered box with overlapping lid and pressure rod with screwfixed clamp and metal tab on side of pickup head


Model FHC Attachable 'Guitar Mike' with one slot, for archtop, with separate volume controller.  This variation was produced for a short period.  (photo copyright Bluestrat27)


Model FHC-B Attachable 'Guitar Mike' for archtop, 'improved', with two slots and separate volume controller.  The last two digits of the year of manufacture were at one stage stamped on the metal tab seen here projecting from the right=hand side of the pickup head.  The number 64 is stamped on this tab.


Model FHC-C Attachable 'Guitar Mike' for archtop, 'improved', with two slots and separate volume controller, chrome or gold-plated


Model FHC-C Attachable pickup with two slots and 'Patent Number 2455046' stamped on the front face


Model FHC-CLH left-handed version of FHC-C


Guitar Mike - The name stamped on the the early versions of the DeArmond Models FH, FHC, FH-B and FHC-B pickups for archtop guitar and RH and RHC pickups for flat-top guitar.  This included the flat-top pickups without visible poles and the archtop pickups with no slots, one, two, three and four slots.


The first version of Model RHC Attachable pickup with no slots, for flat-top roundhole guitar, with integral volume control


Model RH Attachable pickup with two slots, for flat-top roundhole guitar (photo copyright Shawn Patrick)



Model RHC
 Attachable pickup with two slots, for flat-top roundhole guitar, with integral volume control


Model RHC Attachable pickup with three slots, two long and one short at the volume controller side, for flat-top roundhole guitar, with integral volume control - photo pending


Model RHC Attachable pickup with four slots, for flat-top roundhole guitar, with integral volume control



Model RHC-B Attachable pickup, first version with dark brown insert, for flat-top roundhole guitar, the suffix B denotes 'improved', with integral volume control



  Model RHC-B Attachable pickup, second version with semi-translucent maroon insert, for flat-top roundhole guitar,'improved', with integral volume control.  The RH-B and the RHC-B group of pickups are mistakenly said to have only five pole-pieces, because only five are visible.  In fact, there are six, as can be seen with this semi-transparent version.  This pole was shortened and moved away from the strings to balance the combined output of the six strings.

RH-B, as RHC-B pickup below, but without volume controller

Model RHC-B Attachable pickup, third version with white insert, for flat-top roundhole guitar,'improved', with integral volume control


Model RHC-BC Attachable pickup, as model RHC-B above, but with side hole mounting jack and quick-disconnect cable


Packaging and presentation of products:

Every product was supplied with an instruction sheet. 

This instruction sheet is for the Model FHC-C 'Guitar microphone', and was printed at the earliest in 1965, the year that most of Wayne Street, as far as the junction where DeArmond's premises were located, was renamed Airport Highway.


    Some products were also supplied with a returnable guarantee card and a catalog request card.  The latest date for this card is 1965.  Note the card refers to the model 60 Tremolo.

In the 1940s and early 1950s, some product packaging also included a small folder, showing the then comparatively small range of products.  These folders are shown in the catalog section of this website.


The packaging of DeArmond pickups and effects units went through many changes over the years.


 In the very early 1940s, the earliest packaging produced in the Monroe Street, Ohio, premises comprised a black cardboard box with a stick-on yellow label.  The product's model number was stamped on the label by hand.


 In 1946, following its purchase from the Board of Education, the company relocated to the former schoolhouse at 1702 Wayne Street, Ohio.  Packaging was then changed to a silver cardboard box with red lettering, logo and product details printed thereon.  This packaging style was also used for their early effects pedals.


     The next box design enabled the product to be displayed, as shown in these photos of a Model 450 archtop Tenor guitar pickup.  The second photo shows the box open.  The third photo shows the guarantee card, a request card for DeArmond catalogs, the endpin with a hollow centre to permit the pickup's cable to exit, and the flexible steel wire required to 'fish' the cable through the endpin and it's fixing hole.  The pickup's model name was rubber-stamped on the box.


The box design was then modified to display the contents more effectively.  This particular design was used for several years, with only slight modifications.

This yellow box was first introduced when the company was located at 1702 Airport Highway.


 The model 2200 B & T pickups were each sold in a grey cardboard box with a stick-on silver labels.

 The models 76, 2300 and 2400 pickups were each sold in individual dark brown woodgrain-printed boxes with a transparent window.


 This packaging was retained when the company relocated to Arrowhead Park, Ohio, and again retained after the move to 1150 Haskins Road, Bowling Green, Ohio.

 The large foot-pedals were generally sold in a plain cardboard box with a stick-on product label.  This box dates from Holland Park.